Preventing cervical cancer in rural Tanzania: A model program for health worker trainings

Peter Barclay Morrison, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

With a focus on Northern Tanzania, this report seeks to demonstrate the need for increased resource allocation to cervical cancer interventions, examine best practices for cervical cancer screening promotion, and develop an intervention and program evaluation framework. The intervention is a training program designed for dispensary-level healthcare providers in the Northern Zone of Tanzania and aims to increase provider awareness and knowledge of cervical cancer, and build skills among providers to educate patients on cervical cancer prevention and screening and treatment resources. This report is purely a program design and planning tool; no new data was collected, nor interventions implemented in the development of report.^ The first objective of the report is to develop an intervention to be presented to Foundation for Cancer Care in Tanzania (FCCT) and the second is to develop an evaluation framework to be presented to FCCT. FCCT is a non-profit agency working to bring comprehensive cancer services to the region. The program will complement existing and planned services related to cervical cancer prevention and treatment in the Northern Zone of Tanzania, and will be considered for implementation by the Foundation for Cancer Care in Tanzania (FCCT).^ Part I of the report reviews published literature and data to demonstrate the need for increased resource allocation to cervical cancer interventions and the appropriateness of Northern Tanzania as a case selection. Part I also examines best practices for cervical cancer screening promotion in Northern Tanzania, providing evidence from the published literature to inform Part II, the intervention design and program evaluation framework. Included in the intervention design is a logic model for change, detailed training plans and curriculum, and guidelines for selecting trainers. The report recommends appointments to a local planning team and estimates a timeline and budget for the program. Additionally, the report designs a thorough program evaluation, the objective of which is to measure the effect of training and health education materials on dispensary-level healthcare providers’ awareness, knowledge, and skills regarding cervical cancer prevention.^

Subject Area

Public health|Health care management

Recommended Citation

Morrison, Peter Barclay, "Preventing cervical cancer in rural Tanzania: A model program for health worker trainings" (2015). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10027845.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10027845

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