Exploring neighborhood problems and perceptions as influences on social cohesion, collective efficacy, and place attachment as a strategy to improve health

Allison Marshall, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

This study seeks to explore associations between aspects of neighborhood problems such as trash and litter, and collective efficacy, social cohesion, and place attachment in a low-income neighborhood. This paper intends to establish potential targets for community level interventions to reduce neighborhood problems and increase collective efficacy and social cohesion as a starting point to positively impact both health outcomes and health behaviors. Study subjects include parents of students in Austin Independent School District elementary schools within the grant area designated by the Restore Rundberg Initiative. Data were collected through paper community perception surveys. Of 229 respondents, 18 participants identified trash or litter as one of the top three problems in their neighborhood. STATA was used to run t-tests using trash/litter as an independent variable and social cohesion, collective efficacy, and place attachment as dependent variables. No statistically significant relations were found between mention of trash and/or litter and social cohesion, collective efficacy, or place attachment. Larger sample sizes and measures specifically targeting trash and litter are needed to better understand the importance of trash and litter in relation to social cohesion, collective efficacy, and place attachment. Based on an open-ended question, other neighborhood problems are of higher priority to residents of this area. ^

Subject Area

Environmental health|Environmental studies|Public health|Social structure

Recommended Citation

Marshall, Allison, "Exploring neighborhood problems and perceptions as influences on social cohesion, collective efficacy, and place attachment as a strategy to improve health" (2015). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10109677.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10109677

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