Patterns and correlates of internet use, cellphone use, and attitudes towards patient portals among a predominantly Mexican-American clinic population

Meredith Trubitt, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Objectives: To describe access, and health related use of the internet, and cell phones, attitudes towards medical record access and patient portals and willingness to use them in the future. Methods: A bilingual cross-sectional survey was conducted. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to understand factors associated with past Web 2.0 use and willingness to use these technologies in the future. Results: 201 participants were recruited (response rate: 53.3%). Respondents had an average age of 61.5 years, were predominantly female (63.2%), Hispanic (71.6%), of low income (93.0% < $25,000), and low educational attainment (49.8% Objectives: To describe access, and health related use of the internet, and cell phones, attitudes towards medical record access and patient portals and willingness to use them in the future. Methods: A bilingual cross-sectional survey was conducted. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to understand factors associated with past Web 2.0 use and willingness to use these technologies in the future. Results: 201 participants were recruited (response rate: 53.3%). Respondents had an average age of 61.5 years, were predominantly female (63.2%), Hispanic (71.6%), of low income (93.0% < $25,000), and low educational attainment (49.8% < High school). 44.8% reported internet access and 39.3% reported internet use. Barriers identified included access (80%) and not knowing how to use the internet (76.5%). 98.5% reported having a cellphone available in their house, and 76.5% had used a cell phone. 16.3% had heard of a patient portal; 94.5% agreed it was a good idea to review medical records, but only 49.2% thought it was a good idea to review medical records online. In multivariable analyses, younger age (p<0.001) was associated with willingness to use patient portals and text messaging, and health literacy predicted willingness to use patient portals. Conclusion: Significant barriers to use of web 2.0 exist, willingness to use these technologies is higher among younger patients and those with higher health literacy, suggesting that incorporating Web 2.0 strategies into health care may still leave certain populations underserved. ^

Subject Area

Web studies|Hispanic American studies

Recommended Citation

Trubitt, Meredith, "Patterns and correlates of internet use, cellphone use, and attitudes towards patient portals among a predominantly Mexican-American clinic population" (2016). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10126224.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10126224

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