An assessment of long-term services and supports policies for residents of skilled nursing facilities: Where we have been, where are we now, and where we are going

Carmen Castro, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

As the population of individuals 65 years of age and older becomes a large segment of the population, the public health, medical and services social services infrastructure are unprepared to meet the needs of this growing population that will represent 20 percent of the US population by 2050. Although many entering their third age will age with limited health complications, as many as 70% of individuals over age of 65 will need long-term services and supports at some point in their lives. Long-term services and supports may be provided in various settings including a person’s home or in an institution such as a nursing facility. The current system of long-term services and supports is costly, out of the reach of many low-income and middle class individuals, and it is not sufficient to meet their needs. The current system which relies heavily on Medicaid is unsustainable. Caregivers are also at a disadvantage. In the current system, many suffer negative health, financial and professional consequences. This dissertation seeks to assess and review the provision of long-term services and supports throughout the years. It is a prospective study of long-term services and supports in the US and specifically in Texas and its aim is to review and identify past and current long-term services and supports options in order to identify future options which are integrated, affordable and person-centered. The results of this dissertation indicate that some states are doing a better job of meeting the needs of consumers. States such as Minnesota, Oregon and Washington are doing a better job than Texas in meeting the needs consumers. Successful programs have found ways to integrate medical care and social services to provide older adults with the support they need to enjoy the best quality of life possible for them despite any physical or cognitive limitations they might experience.^

Subject Area

Aging|Public health|Public policy

Recommended Citation

Castro, Carmen, "An assessment of long-term services and supports policies for residents of skilled nursing facilities: Where we have been, where are we now, and where we are going" (2016). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10250062.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10250062

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