Exploring Associations between the Use of Psychoactive Substances and E-Cigarettes in a Nationally Representative Sample of Young Adults

Meagan Bluestein, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

A secondary data analysis of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study Wave 1 sample of young adults between the ages of 18-24 (n=8,954) was conducted. The goal of this study is to determine if psychoactive substances are risk factors for e-cigarette use outcomes. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for the association between ever use of psychoactive substances (alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and prescription drugs) and different e-cigarette use outcomes (past 30 days, former established use, former experimental use, and never use). Interactions between psychoactive substance use exposures were also explored. Results indicated that the ever use of psychoactive substances exhibits significant associations with e-cigarette use outcomes Difference of proportion tests were also used to determine if former established and former experimental users exhibit similar psychoactive substance use prevalence as never users of e-cigarettes. The psychoactive substance use prevalence rates were different former established users and never users of e-cigarettes, and between former experimental users and never users of e-cigarettes. This study has provided evidence that the ever use of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and prescription drugs exhibit significant associations with e-cigarette use outcomes.^

Subject Area

Social research|Epidemiology

Recommended Citation

Bluestein, Meagan, "Exploring Associations between the Use of Psychoactive Substances and E-Cigarettes in a Nationally Representative Sample of Young Adults" (2017). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10275505.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10275505

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