Parent Psychosocial Outcomes from a School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Co-Op for Low-Income Families: A Quasi-Experimental Study

Johannah Frelier, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the impact of Brighter Bites, a school-based nutrition program, on parental psychosocial outcomes related to fruit and vegetable intake of low-income families in Houston, Texas. Baseline demographic data for group differences was tested using Pearson’s Chi-square test and paired t-tests, and group-by-time interaction terms for net changes in parent psychosocial outcomes between study groups over time using a multilevel mixed-effects logistic or linear regression. The study demonstrated no statistically significant changes between intervention and control groups for any psychosocial construct measured; however, Brighter Bites had a statistically significant impact on self-efficacy related to fruit and vegetable intake and intention to consume fruit and vegetables within the intervention group. These findings indicate that nutrition interventions should prioritize strategies that combine food accessibility with nutrition education to improve parental self-efficacy, intention, and to have greatest impact on fruit and vegetable intake among low-income school children.^

Subject Area

Public health|Behavioral sciences|Individual & family studies|Health education

Recommended Citation

Frelier, Johannah, "Parent Psychosocial Outcomes from a School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Co-Op for Low-Income Families: A Quasi-Experimental Study" (2017). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10276223.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10276223

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