Intestinal Carriage Patterns of Staphylococcus Aureus in a Community-Based Population Living in Starr County, Texas

Robert Spencer, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus, particularly highly pathogenic and antibiotic-resistant strains (MRSA), pose a public health threat to both hospitalized and community populations. Previous research has shown individuals who are nasal carriers of S. aureus have a greater risk for infection than nasal non-carriers. The intestines also offer a shared environmental niche where Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) could transfer vancomycin-resistance to strains of S. aureus (including MRSA). New research also suggests that nasal carriage may alter an individual’s ability to regulate their blood glucose. S. aureus can also colonize the intestinal tract and may contribute to the effects of the intestinal microbiome on glucose regulation. While nasal carriage has been widely investigated intestinal carriage has been somewhat overlooked, particularly in community-based populations. In this study we analyzed intestinal carriage of S. aureus to identify factors associated with positive intestinal carriage. Using logistic regression we found nasal ever carriage to be significantly associated with intestinal carriage (OR=7.22, 95% C.I. [3.40, 15.31], p<0.001). Antibiotic use in the past 12 months was also showed a weak negative association with intestinal carriage (p=0.045), but this association disappeared when adjusting for covariates during logistic regression modeling. This study provides new insight into patterns of intestinal carriage in a community-based population. ^

Subject Area

Public health|Epidemiology

Recommended Citation

Spencer, Robert, "Intestinal Carriage Patterns of Staphylococcus Aureus in a Community-Based Population Living in Starr County, Texas" (2017). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10276337.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10276337

Share

COinS