Effect of Breastfeeding Education on Breastfeeding Intention, Duration and Knowledge Among Low-Income Minority Mothers

Sania Durrani, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Evidence suggests that breastfeeding is associated with health benefits and risk reduction among mothers and infants. The gap between current breastfeeding behavior and the Healthy People 2020 goal is most wide for African American women as compared to White, Hispanic and Asian mothers. The objective of this study is to use data from one group pre-post intervention study to measure the differences in breastfeeding variables between pre- and post-intervention among low-income minority mothers. In order, to measure the differences, ANCOVA, linear regression analysis and signrank test were used.^ Results show that women who completed the HEAL program (n=210) displayed an increase in intended breastfeeding intiation, duration and knowledge between pre- and post-intervention. These changes were also seen when the data was stratified by race. Limitations of the study included lack of a control group and randomization and the data only measuring intended method and duration. Future research should focus on recruitment of a control group and randomization, and measurement of actual breastfeeding behavior post delivery.^

Subject Area

Health education

Recommended Citation

Durrani, Sania, "Effect of Breastfeeding Education on Breastfeeding Intention, Duration and Knowledge Among Low-Income Minority Mothers" (2017). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10276445.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10276445

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