Percent Change in Heart-Rate for Child Participants of an Obesity Prevention Program and its Association with Improvemtns in Parent's Physical Activity

Veronica Medellin, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Using data from the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition, Do it (MEND) program, the study aimed was to evaluate if parental involvement in physical activity had any effect in the child’s heart-rate when compared to the child’s baseline heart-rate. Parent and child pair participants attended a total of 20 sessions during a 10 week period meeting two hours at each session. The sessions consisted of one hour of nutrition, goal setting, and non-food reward education, while the second hour consisted of CATCH games for the child. The second hour allowed the parents to openly discuss any concerns they had without the children present. The sessions took place in a variety of settings in the Brownsville community including schools, clinics and worship centers. Based on the multivariable analysis children who had high pre intervention heart-rate (>110) experienced greater reductions in heart-rate compared to those who had low pre intervention heart-rate (<=95). The mean percentage of sessions attended for the MEND program was 82%. The high attendance rate suggests that the families found this community-based intervention beneficial. However, parental physical activity improvement was not related to the improvement in heart-rate in children based on the multivariable regression analysis. ^

Subject Area

Hispanic American studies

Recommended Citation

Medellin, Veronica, "Percent Change in Heart-Rate for Child Participants of an Obesity Prevention Program and its Association with Improvemtns in Parent's Physical Activity" (2017). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10284596.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10284596

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