Evaluation of Ultraviolet Radiation Disinfection for Preventing the Transmission of Clostridium Difficile Infections in a Healthcare Facility

Mario Soares, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Background: Evaluate if adding ultraviolet irradiation (UV-C) to conventional terminal isolation room cleaning methods reduces Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) compared to conventional hospital environmental cleaning methods alone.^ Methods: CDI rates (hospital-acquired [HA] and community acquired [CA]), patient length of stay and room infection-free days were compared for a period of 12 months before and6 months after the implementation of UV-C disinfection in a tertiary hospital. ^ Results: 1121 CDI cases (including HA and CA cases) were studied. Compared to the pre-intervention period, the UV-C disinfection period saw an increase in both total monthly CDI cases (60 cases vs 66 cases) and community-acquired CDI cases (31 cases vs 38cases), but the average monthly hospital-acquired CDI cases decreased (29 cases vs 28 cases). Total CDI rates significantly increased by 21% (P < 0.001). Community-acquired CDI rates also increased by 35% (P >0.0001). However, the rate of hospital-acquired CDI did not change significantly (P = 0.13). The length of hospital stay for all HA and CA CDI cases decreased by 33% during the UV-C disinfection period (P < 0.0001). The median infection-free days in the room after CDI patient discharge during the pre-intervention periods and UV-C disinfection and were markedly different (74.5 days vs 24 days; P>0.001). ^ Conclusion: The data suggest that UV-C disinfection was beneficial in reducing HA CDI trends. A randomized controlled trial of UV-C disinfection use is needed to confirm the effect of UV-C disinfection on C. difficile transmission.^

Subject Area

Public health|Epidemiology|Environmental science

Recommended Citation

Soares, Mario, "Evaluation of Ultraviolet Radiation Disinfection for Preventing the Transmission of Clostridium Difficile Infections in a Healthcare Facility" (2017). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI10620113.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI10620113

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