Systematic review of acceptance of the influenza vaccine among pregnant women

Karen S Stephenson, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Exposure to influenza places pregnant women at risk for pneumonia and their fetus at risk for premature delivery or fatal stillbirth secondary to maternal hypoxia. Immunization rates are low among pregnant women. Influenza vaccine specific-health belief model constructs, such as cue to action messages from the health care professionals, may increase acceptance of the vaccine and improve immunization rates. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the impact of physician recommendation upon acceptance of the influenza vaccine by pregnant women. Pregnant women were more likely to accept the influenza vaccine if they received a recommendation from their physician. These women were also more likely to accept the vaccine if they thought the vaccine protected mother and fetus against adverse effects of influenza and were less likely to accept the vaccine if they were concerned about side effects or risk to the fetus from the vaccine.^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Public Health

Recommended Citation

Karen S Stephenson, "Systematic review of acceptance of the influenza vaccine among pregnant women" (January 1, 2011). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). Paper AAI1487854.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI1487854

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