Program evaluation for a summer science internship: Short and long term benefits as reported by interns

Erica Cantu, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Undergraduate research programs have been used as a tool to attract and retain student interest in science careers. This study evaluates the short and long-term benefits of a Summer Science Internship (SSI) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston– School of Public Health – in Brownsville, Texas, by analyzing survey data from alumni. Questions assessing short-term program impact were aimed at three main topics, student: satisfaction with program, self-efficacy for science after completing the program, and perceived benefits. Long-term program impact was assessed by looking at student school attendance and college majors along with perceived links between SSI and future college plans. Students reported high program satisfaction, a significant increase in science self-efficacy and high perceived benefits. At the time data were collected for the study, one-hundred percent of alumni were enrolled in school (high school or college). The majority of students indicated they were interested in completing a science major/career, heavily influenced by their participation in the program.^

Subject Area

Education, Evaluation|Health Sciences, Public Health Education

Recommended Citation

Erica Cantu, "Program evaluation for a summer science internship: Short and long term benefits as reported by interns" (January 1, 2011). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). Paper AAI1502166.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI1502166

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