A cross-sectional analysis of the association between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diesel particulate matter exposures and hypertension among individuals of Mexican origin residing in Houston, TX

Komal Bangia, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Background. Research has shown that elevations of only 10 mmHg diastolic blood pressure (BP) and 5 mmHg systolic BP are associated with substantial (as large as 50%) increases in risks for cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of death, worldwide. Epidemiological studies have found that particulate matter (PM) increases blood pressure (BP) and many biological mechanisms which may suggest that the organic matter of PM contributes to the increase in BP. To understand components of PM which may contribute to the increase in BP, this study focuses on diesel particulate matter (DPM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To our knowledge, there have been only four epidemiological studies on BP and DPM, and no epidemiological studies on BP and PAHs. ^ Objective. Our objective was to evaluate the association between prevalent hypertension and two ambient exposures: DPM and PAHs amongst the Mano a Mano cohort. ^ Methods. The Mano a Mano cohort which was established by the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in 2001, is comprised of individuals of Mexican origin residing in Houston, TX. Using geographical information systems, we linked modeled annual estimates of PAHs and DPM at the census track level from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment to residential addresses of cohort members. Mixed-effects logistic regression models were applied to determine associations between DPM and PAHs and hypertension while adjusting for confounders. ^ Results. Ambient levels of DPM, categorized into quartiles, were not statistically associated with hypertension and did not indicate a dose response relationship. Ambient levels of PAHs, categorized into quartiles, were not associated with hypertension, but did indicate a dose response relationship in multiple models (for example: Q2: OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.73–1.31, Q3: OR = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.82–1.41, Q4: OR = 1.26; 95% CI, 0.94–1.70). ^ Conclusion. This is the first assessment to analyze the relationship between ambient levels of PAHs and hypertension and it is amongst a few studies investigating the association between ambient levels of DPM and hypertension. Future analyses are warranted to explore the effects DPM and PAHs using different categorizations in order to clarify their relationships with hypertension.^

Subject Area

Environmental Health|Hispanic American Studies|Health Sciences, Epidemiology|Environmental Sciences

Recommended Citation

Komal Bangia, "A cross-sectional analysis of the association between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diesel particulate matter exposures and hypertension among individuals of Mexican origin residing in Houston, TX" (January 1, 2011). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). Paper AAI1507230.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI1507230

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