Soft tissue oral wound healing in diabetic patients

Vy H Nguyen, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

This prospective observational cohort study investigated whether diabetic dental patients with poor glycemic control experience a higher risk of post-operative complications and diminished wound healing abilities after an oral surgical procedure such as implant placement. This study compared soft tissue oral wound healing complications between poorly controlled diabetic patients, well controlled diabetic patients and non-diabetic patients following surgical implant placement in the mandible with a total of 131 patients. A one week post-surgical follow-up visit involved an oral wound examination that consisted of evaluating for edema, erythema, exudate, oral pain, problems with flap closure, infection, and hematoma. Analyses were performed to determine significance differences in frequency of oral wound complications between the 3 diabetic groups. Two-by-two contingency tables using chi-square analysis were used to evaluate for significant differences in the proportion of each post-operative oral wound healing complication. This was done separately between non-diabetics and diabetics and between well-controlled and poorly controlled diabetics to calculate odds ratios. Confidence intervals were also calculated. This preliminary study showed that many of the complications were found not to be associated with diabetic status. Other complications such as edema and problems with flap closure were found to be less likely to occur in diabetics compared to non-diabetics and even in poorly controlled diabetics when compared to well-controlled diabetics. The results did not support the hypothesis that diabetic dental patients experience a higher risk than non-diabetic patients of post-operative soft tissue oral wound complications.^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Dentistry|Health Sciences, Public Health

Recommended Citation

Vy H Nguyen, "Soft tissue oral wound healing in diabetic patients" (January 1, 2012). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). Paper AAI1516386.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI1516386

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