Genetic characterization of S. aureus nasal colonization in a population of healthy HIV-infected adults and children in Botswana

Zoe K Apted, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is both a commensal organism and an opportunistic pathogen. As a pathogen, it causes infections leading to a wide array of diseases ranging from mild localized skin infections to life-threatening cases of pneumonia, septicemia, and endocarditis. The type of infection caused by S. aureus is dependent on several factors including the virulence of the infecting strain as well as host dynamics (e.g., genetics, immune status, co-morbidities). Nasal colonization has been widely documented as a major risk factor for S. aureus infection. Individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at a particularly high risk for both S. aureus colonization and infection. Additionally, infections of HIV+ individuals are usually more severe and possibly life threatening. ^ S. aureus is a major pathogen in Africa with many circulating strains derived from highly virulent genetic lineages. This is of particular concern in Botswana where the prevalence of HIV infection (25%) is among the highest of all African countries. S. aureus infections are on the rise in southern Africa, but colonization and disease presentation remain poorly understood in this region. In Botswana, there are no current data on the genetic lineages of the nasally colonizing strains of S. aureus circulating within the HIV-infected population. Genotyping of the S. aureus strains circulating within this high-risk population would provide a description of key risk factors associated with colonization and infection, as well as an opportunity to develop more efficient prevention and treatment strategies for this high risk population. ^

Subject Area

Biology, Genetics|Biology, Microbiology|Health Sciences, Epidemiology

Recommended Citation

Apted, Zoe K, "Genetic characterization of S. aureus nasal colonization in a population of healthy HIV-infected adults and children in Botswana" (2014). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI1568440.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI1568440

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