Role of sleep and sleep-related correlates in the development of delirium: A feasibility study

Kathy Missildine, The University of Texas School of Nursing at Houston

Abstract

Purpose of the study. The purpose was to determine if sleep deprivation in hospitalized older adults predicts the development of delirium, and if sleep is predicted by nighttime light and sound levels. ^ Method. This observational feasibility study enrolled 54 adults ≥70 years of age (mean age 79, range 70–94) who were negative for delirium. The sample was monitored for sleep via wrist actigraphy, and light and sound levels were monitored from 2200 to 0700 the first night of hospitalization. The Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ) was administered to measure subjective sleep satisfaction. Subjects were assessed for delirium daily using the Confusion Assessment Method. ^ Conclusions. Of 50 subjects completing the study, two (4%) developed delirium. Mean nighttime sleep was 225 minutes (± 137) with frequent awakenings (13 ± 6) Light levels were elevated episodically (mean intense light = 64 lux, lasting 1¾ hours); median sound levels [49.65 dB(A)] exceeded WHO recommendations [35 dB(A)]. Neither median sound (r = -.63, p = 67) nor mean light levels (r = -.104, p = .47) significantly correlated with sleep. Mean RCSQ was 50.7 ± 24 and showed a moderate correlation with nighttime sleep minutes (r = .577, p .000). Power analysis determined that 294 subjects will be required to determine if nighttime sleep minutes predict delirium, and 182 subjects will be required to determine if sound and light levels predict nighttime sleep minutes.^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Nursing

Recommended Citation

Missildine, Kathy, "Role of sleep and sleep-related correlates in the development of delirium: A feasibility study" (2008). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI3309239.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI3309239

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