An interactive intervention to impact adherence to antiretroviral treatment among treatment-naive HIV-infected adults in Thailand: A pilot randomized controlled study

Krittapat Fukfon, The University of Texas School of Nursing at Houston

Abstract

Background. Consistent adherence to antiretroviral treatment is necessary for a treatment success. Improving and maintaining adherence rate >95% are challenging for health care professionals. This pilot randomized controlled study aimed to evaluate the impact of the interactive intervention on adherence to GPO-VIR, to describe the feasibility of the interactive intervention in Thailand, and to illustrate the adherence self-efficacy concept among HIV treatment-naïve patients in Thailand who were starting antiretroviral treatment. ^ Methods. The study took place at three HIV clinics located in Phayao, Thailand. Twenty-three patients were randomly assigned into the experimental (n=11) and the control groups (n=12). Each participant in the experimental group and a significant person to the patient received 5 educational sessions with a nurse at the clinics and at their homes. They also received 3 follow-up evaluations during the 6-month period of the study. The participants in the control group received the standard of care provided by HIV clinical personnel plus three follow-up evaluations at the clinic. ^ Results. Seventeen patients (7 in the experimental and 10 in the control group) completed the study. The 4-day recall on the Thai ACTG Adherence Scale demonstrated adherence rate >95% for most participants from both groups. After the first measurement, no experimental group patients reporting missing ART, while one control group participant continuously skipped ART. Participants from both groups had significantly increased CD4 cell counts after the study (F(1, 15) = 29.30, p = .000), but no differences were found between two groups (F(1, 15) = .001, p = .98). Examination of the intervention showed limitations and possibilities to implement it in Thailand. Qualitative data demonstrated self-efficacy expectations, resignation and acceptance as related concepts to improve adherence outcomes. ^ Conclusions. This interactive intervention, after appropriate modifications, is feasible to apply for Thai HIV-treatment naïve patients. Because of limitations the study could not demonstrate whether the interactive intervention improved adherence to ART among HIV-treatment naïve in Thailand. A longitudinal study in a larger sample would be required to test the impact of the intervention. ^ Keyword: antiretroviral treatment, adherence, treatment-naïve, Thailand, randomized controlled study ^

Subject Area

Asian Studies|Health Sciences, Nursing

Recommended Citation

Krittapat Fukfon, "An interactive intervention to impact adherence to antiretroviral treatment among treatment-naive HIV-infected adults in Thailand: A pilot randomized controlled study" (January 1, 2010). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). Paper AAI3445860.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI3445860

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