The association between parity and selected structural birth defects

Melanie L McNeese, The University of Texas School of Public Health

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Parity is a risk factor in neonatal morbidity and mortality. This dissertation examined the association between first births and selected birth defects. The first aim was to assess the risk of 66 birth defects among first births and third or greater births. The second aim was to determine if maternal race, maternal age, infant sex or infant birth weight modify the association between first births and selected birth defects. METHODS: The Texas Birth Defects Registry provided data for 1999-2009. For the first aim, odds ratios were calculated for each birth defect. For the second aim, analysis was restricted to the ten birth defects significantly associated with first births. Stratified analyses were conducted and interaction terms were added to logistic regression models to assess whether differences in the odds ratios for the effect of first birth were statistically significant across strata. RESULTS: Findings for the first aim showed that first births had significantly increased odds of having an infant with 24 of the 66 birth defects. Third or greater births had significantly increased odds of having four of the 66 birth defects. For the second aim, a number of significant effect modifiers were observed. For patent ductus arteriosis, obstructive urinary defects and gastroschisis, the effect of first births was significantly modified by black or U.S.-born Hispanic mothers. The effect of first birth was also significantly modified among mothers ≥30 years for mitral valve insufficiency, atrial septal defect and congenital hip dislocation. The effect of first births was significantly modified among infants with low birth weight for hypospadias, congenital hip dislocation and gastroschisis. CONCLUSIONS: First births were associated with an elevated risk of 24 categories of birth defects. For some of the birth defects studied, the effect of first birth is modified by maternal age, maternal race and low birth weight. Knowledge of the increased risk for birth defects among women having their first birth allows physicians and midwives to provide better patient care and spur further research into the etiology of associated birth defects. This knowledge may bring about interventions prior to conception in populations most likely to conceive.^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Epidemiology

Recommended Citation

McNeese, Melanie L, "The association between parity and selected structural birth defects" (2013). Texas Medical Center Dissertations (via ProQuest). AAI3568279.
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/dissertations/AAI3568279

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