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Abstract

Preservice teachers in a bilingual education teacher preparation program created digital narratives that told their cultural stories within a sociocultural framework. The study revealed that the creation of digital stories within a sociocultural framework allowed preservice teachers to better understand their cultural heritages and unique places in society. This process allowed the preservice teachers to share their voices with audiences that they may have never considered before. Their newfound voices gave them the confidence to share with others about their identity and created a sense of belonging in their worlds in which they lived.

Key Take Away Points

  • Preservice teachers in a bilingual education teacher preparation program created digital narratives that told their cultural stories within a sociocultural framework.
  • The study revealed that the creation of digital stories within a sociocultural framework allowed preservice teachers to better understand their cultural heritages and unique places in society.
  • This process allowed the preservice teachers to share their voices with audiences that they may have never considered before.
  • Their newfound voices gave them the confidence to share with others about their identity and created a sense of belonging in their worlds in which they lived.

Author Biography

Laura A. Mitchell, Ed.D., is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Houston-Downtown. Laura’s passion for teaching and learning led her to Fielding Graduate University, where she completed her Doctorate of Education in the School of Educational Leadership and Change. Laura has worked in elementary schools as a bilingual education teacher, campus coordinator, and an assistant principal for 25 years. Now as an Associate Professor, she combines her passions for teaching multilingual students and leading teachers to discover their own passion for teaching. She may be reached at mitchelll@uhd.edu, 713-446-4055. Diane M. Miller, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Literacy Education in the Department of Urban Education at the University of Houston-Downtown. In her teacher education courses, she addresses literacy development and instructional techniques for both elementary and secondary preservice teachers. Her research interests are content-area literacy instruction, adolescent literacy, bridging research to practice, and hybrid learning environments. She may be reached at petersond@uhd.edu. Colin Dalton, Ed.D., is an Assistant Professor of Literacy Education and Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages (TESOL) in the Department of Urban Education at the University of Houston-Downtown. His classes prepare pre-service teachers to teach literacy development at the elementary and secondary school levels. His teaching and research interests include literacy development and practice utilizing alternate texts and developing life-long readers. He may be reached at daltonc@uhd.edu.

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