Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0001-9841-1411

Date of Graduation

5-2017

Document Type

Thesis (MS)

Program Affiliation

Genetic Counseling

Degree Name

Masters of Science (MS)

Advisor/Committee Chair

Claire Singletary, MS, CGC

Committee Member

Jennifer Hoskovec, MS, CGC

Committee Member

Patricia McCarthy Veach, PhD, LP

Committee Member

Michelle Barton, PhD

Committee Member

Allison Ownby, PhD, MEd

Abstract

Job openings outpace new graduates due to exponential growth in genetic counseling, leading to a workforce shortage. Expanding training slots to meet this demand presumably is linked to the number of supervisors. Thus, there is a need to systematically review barriers to supervision. This study aimed to determine and compare barriers to expansion of supervision networks at genetic counseling training programs as perceived by current supervisors, non-supervisors, and Program Directors. Certified genetic counselors were recruited via National Society of Genetic Counselors e-blast with an invitation to complete an online survey; Program Directors were emailed personal letters of invitation. Twenty-three Program Directors, 216 supervisors, and 98 non-supervisors completed surveys. Respondents rated the impactfulness of 35 barriers (scale: 1=not impactful to 4=very impactful); Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon ranked sum tests were used to compare perceptions. Half of supervisors (51%) indicated a willingness to increase supervision and all non-supervisors were willing to supervise. All agreed; however, that being too busy impacted ability to expand time supervising. This is highlighted by the most impactful barriers for supervisors: lack of time, too many responsibilities, intensive nature of supervision, desire for breaks, and unfilled positions. Non-supervisors noted unique barriers (p

Keywords

genetic counseling, supervision, expansion, barriers, countable case, efficiency, workforce

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