Title

Explanations for unsuccessful weight loss among bariatric surgery candidates.

Publication Date

10-1-2009

Journal

Obesity Surgery

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Our objective was to analyze subjective explanations for unsuccessful weight loss among bariatric surgery candidates.

METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of 909 bariatric surgery candidates (78.2% female, average body mass index [BMI] 47.3) at a university center from 2001 to April 2007 who answered an open-ended question about why they were unable to lose weight. We generated a coding scheme for answers to the question and established inter-rater reliability of the coding process. Associations with demographic parameters and initial BMI were tested.

RESULTS: The most common categories of answers were nonspecific explanations related to diet (25.3%), physical activity (21.0%), or motivation (19.7%), followed by diet-related motivation (12.7%) and medical conditions or medications affecting physical activity (12.7%). Categories related to time, financial cost, social support, physical environment, and knowledge occurred in less than 4% each. Men were more likely than women to cite a medical condition or medication affecting physical activity (19.2% vs 10.8%, P = 0.002, odds ratio [OR] = 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28-2.99) but less likely to cite diet-related motivation (7.1% vs 14.2%, P = 0.008, OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.26-0.82).

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that addressing diet, physical activity, and motivation in a comprehensive approach would meet the stated needs of obese patients. Raising patient awareness of under-recognized barriers to weight loss, such as the physical environment and lack of social support, should also be considered. Lastly, anticipating gender-specific attributions may facilitate tailoring of interventions.

Keywords

Adult, Bariatric Surgery, Body Mass Index, Diet, Reducing, Exercise, Female, Humans, Male, Motivation, Obesity, Morbid, Retrospective Studies, Social Support, Treatment Failure, Weight Loss