Date of Award

Spring 5-2020

Degree Name

Doctor of Public Health (DrPH)

Advisor(s)

WENDELL C TAYLOR PHD MPH

Second Advisor

WENYAW CHAN PHD

Third Advisor

GEORGE L DELCLOS MD MPH PHD

Abstract

Abstract: Sedentary behavior can lead to premature mortality, cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer incidence. Office workers are at risk for high amounts of sedentary behavior. Even brief bouts of physical activity that interrupt sedentary behavior can improve office workers’ physical and mental health. The workplace is an optimal setting for increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior among office workers. However, limited literature exists related to the characteristics of participants that adhere to workplace physical activity interventions. This study aimed to identify characteristics of participants who enrolled in the Booster Break program, a 15 minute once-daily intervention during the workday. The main study hypotheses were: 1. Physically active individuals will be more likely to adhere the intervention; 2. Participants who report greater perceived self-efficacy for physical activity will be more likely to adhere to the intervention; 3. Participants who report greater perceived enjoyment for physical activity will be more likely to adhere to the intervention; 4. Participants who report greater perceived benefits for physical activity will be more likely to adhere to the intervention; and 5. Participants who report greater social support for physical activity at baseline will be more likely to adhere to the intervention. Adherence to the intervention was defined as completion of baseline and 6-month self-report physical activity assessments. Logistic regression models were used to predict adherence to the intervention for each of the independent variables: physical activity, self efficacy, perceived enjoyment, perceived benefits, and social support. In the statistical analyses, the main study hypotheses were not supported. Descriptive statistics were used to further examine trends. Participants with lower baseline physical activity (pedometer) were more likely to adhere to the intervention. Mean baseline scores for perceived enjoyment, self-efficacy for moderate-intensity physical activity, and social support were greater among those who adhered to the Booster Break program. These results suggest that the Booster Break program matches the needs of adults with less physical activity experience. Future workplace interventions may need to address perceived self-efficacy (i.e., competence), perceived social support (i.e., relatedness), and perceived enjoyment (i.e., autonomy) for physical activity in order to increase intervention adherence.

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