Date of Award

Spring 5-2019

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Advisor(s)

ANDREW SPRINGER, DRPH

Second Advisor

H. SHELTON BROWN III, PHD

Third Advisor

LORI HOLLERAN STEIKER, PHD

Abstract

The prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) is greater among full-time college students and young adults regardless of enrollment status than it is among any other age group (1,2). These disorders represent substantial costs to both society and to institutions of higher education, both in terms of life years lost and in lost tuition revenue. The recent proliferation of collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) – supportive communities and resource centers for students seeking to maintain SUD recovery while pursuing a higher education – have the potential to help ameliorate some of these costs. While these CRPs are typically low-cost compared to acute care, a cost-effectiveness analysis of these programs has not yet been undertaken. In a comprehensive cost-effectiveness analysis, these programs were found to be cost-effective by the standards of the cost-effectiveness reference case from the societal perspective, and in line with the cost-effectiveness of other college health and wellness programs from the institutional perspective (3,4). In addition to being cost-effective, CRPs represent a cost savings to society and institutions across a wide range of variation.

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