Author Biographical Info

Leon Dmochowski was a virologist, experimental oncologist, and academic born on July 1, 1909 in Ternopil (Ukraine; at that time Austrian crown land of Galicia). From 1955 he was also professor ofexperimental pathology at the University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine, and, from 1965, professor of virology at the new University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Additionally, he was a clinical professor at the Baylor University College of Medicine (from 1955), and a distinguished lecturer at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta (1966). He was the author or co-author of over 450 articles and papers, as well as chapters in several books. He was at the forefront of research into the role of viruses in oncology, one of the first researchers to report the viral origins of various malignant tumors (1953), and a pioneer in the application of electron microscopy in oncovirology. He also discovered viruses which cause leucosis in rodents and demonstrated the presence of such viruses in human beings. See more at https://archives.library.tmc.edu/ms-020.

Publication Date

11-9-2021

Keywords

Virology, Oncology, Pathology, Houston (TX), Ukrainian Medical Association of North America, Baylor College of Medicine, Leon Dmochowski, reprints, reports, manuscripts (documents)

Abstract

The Leon Dmochowski, MD, PhD papers contain article reprints, reports and an undated manuscript related to his career in oncology and virology. The collection contains 2 boxes equaling 1 cubic foot, the materials are mostly in good condition. One item has water damage. See more at MS 020.

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Source is unknown. Assumed to be the creator.

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